Clarification of discussion question

My initial explanation of the discussion question was not quite as clear as it should have been, so I’m going to try to clarify. Sorry if anyone didn’t understand what I was asking.

It’s fine if you just write on one of the poems or one of the cartoons. Basically, the question I want you to address is: How does this text use its own material/technological conditions of production as an aesthetic resource? That is, how does it make creative use of the fact that it’s produced by certain processes (e.g. cel animation or letterpress printing) and that it’s made of certain materials (e.g. paper, ink and cels)? And/or, how does the text get you to think about the materials of which it’s made and the processes by which it was produced? For example, what does Un coup de des tell us about the cultural or social associations of letterpress printing and bookbinding?

I obviously don’t expect you to answer all these questions. Just try to make a start on addressing them.

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Published in: on January 21, 2010 at 8:21 pm  Comments (1)  

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  1. Felix the cat in “comicalamities” was made brilliantly with the use of cel animation. Due to the fact that the entire environment around Felix was ink, he manipulated it to his will, and changed its physical form from one thing to something that looked similar, but completely changed its purpose. For example, when he wanted the mouses coat for his female companion, he grabbed the line that was supposed to be the ground and dragged the mouse over to him. When that didn’t work, he had a hand (on a cel) grab the mouse and take his coat off for him. The ink can literally flow into any form desired, and because of that, Felix is able to manipulate his environment for many comical situations.


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